Resources

I. The Articles of Religion of the United Methodist Church
The Articles of Religion are the oldest body of doctrine in the United Methodist Church. The twenty-five articles were approved at the time the Methodist Episcopal Church was founded in 1784 and have remained the heart of the Church’s doctrinal standards since that time. The articles cover the range of basic Christian belief and stand as the Church’s official statements on the topics they represent.

II. The Confession of Faith of the United Methodist Church
The sixteen articles within the Confession of Faith are made up of doctrinal statements of the United Methodist Church on topics ranging from God to the Church, and from Sin to Salvation. They offer faithful guidance to Methodists on core Christian beliefs, and they are part of the United Methodist Church’s doctrinal standards.

III. The General Rules (First edition)
The General Rules provide a summary guide to how Christians can apply the means of grace in their daily lives. First published by John Wesley in 1743, the copy available here is a facsimile of the first edition.

IV. Holy Conferencing: The Grace of Christian Conversation and Fellowship
This video teaching session explains the Wesleyan background on Christian conference as a means of grace. It also offers guidance for how ‘holy conferencing’ can be employed in congregational ministry today.

V. Covenant Prayer in the Wesleyan Tradition
This prayer of humility and recommitment has been utilized in Methodist practice for over 250 years. It is especially appropriate to pray during a season of personal repentance, or at the beginning of a new year.

VI. Pastoral Care in the Wesleyan Tradition
This document is a syllabus from a course co-taught by Dr. Lee Ramsey and Dr. Andrew Thompson at Memphis Theological Seminary in the Spring semester of 2014 entitled, “Pastoral Care in the Wesleyan Tradition.” The course outlined in this syllabus is an attempt to engage in cross-disciplinary work, bringing the resources of church history (and particularly the Wesleyan tradition) to bear on the contemporary understanding of the theology and practice of pastoral care.